Wrote an in-print feature about my buddy James’ boutique pedal shop for the OC Weekly. If you are a musician–especially one fond of adjectives like fuzz, reverb and distortion–you should definitely stop by.

Giving these notes some room to breathe

 

Dawn of the Shred Has a Special Effect on Local Sound

Gearheads flock to the Long Beach guitar shop for hard-to-find accessories

On a recent Friday night, Andy Zipf and Sam West were in the far-back corner of East Long Beach’s Dawn of the Shred, warming up for the gear shop’s first in-store performance. Zipf plucked at a new semi-hollow prototype from Wilmore Guitars, the Long Beach-based company that organized the event.

Plugged into a white Marshall amplifier, the handmade guitar sounded warm and clean, almost dreamy in tone. The singer/songwriter smiled to himself; gliding from note to note, he looked genuinely astonished as he faced West at the drum kit. “This guitar is really cool,” he whispered.

“I know,” West slowly mouthed back.

This is the reaction most musicians have when trying out stuff at Dawn of the Shred, a store specializing in handcrafted and small-batch amps, guitars and effects pedals. In its cavernous storefront across from Heartwell Park, you won’t find any mediocre Boss distortion pedals or Fender Stratocaster gift packs—just a generous selection of small, quality brands; select vintage finds; and owner James Demetra, who is more than happy to help you navigate through it all. “I genuinely enjoy selling stuff,” says the scruffy, heavily inked Demetra. “I love those moments when everything clicks, such as when a musician has found what he’s looking for in the store and is playing it through the right pedal or the right amp. It all becomes one, if I can get overly romantic about it.”

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Congrats to Long Beach’s own Andrew Pedroza and Ellen Warkentine for having their opus LOLPERA (yes, an opera based on the Lolcats internet meme) accepted into both the Hollywood Fringe Festival and the New York International Fringe Festival! I have been following this project since its initial workshop back in 2010 and to see it come this far and on the verge of being shared with the world makes me all kinds of proud mama. Thanks to L.A. Weekly for letting me cover this extraordinary moment in internet-meets-reality meaning-making.

Hollywood Fringe Festival Can Has LOLPERA

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Fresh Frame Foto
LOLPERA co-creator Andrew Pedroza (center) as Dreamer Cat in last fall’s production at the Garage Theatre in Long Beach

It’s a warm Saturday afternoon a month before the start of the Hollywood Fringe Festival and LOLPERAis in its first day of rehearsal. Cast members have just finished a run-through of the work’s dramatic opening number in the living room of Director Angela Lopez’s Long Beach apartment. The word “masterbate,” which was sung loudly and repeatedly as part of the chorus, reverberates off the walls.

“Okay, that was good,” Lopez casually tells the group, many of who were also a part of LOLPERA‘s original run at the 35-seat Garage Theatre last October, when it was L.A. Weekly‘s pick of the week. “Let’s try it one more time — starting from ‘Ceiling Cat rode invisible bike over teh waterz.'”

Yes, those are the stage directions, which in this show can’t help but sound a little silly. As an opera based on the Lolcats internet meme, LOLPERA‘s plot, aria, characters and libretto are culled from the wide range of user-generated images that combine photos of cats with overlying text of their grammatically incorrect and adorably poorly spelled thoughts.

READ THE REST IN THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF L.A. WEEKLY OR ONLINE AT LAWEEKLY.COM